Scholarships and Competitions Help Cut College Costs

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Scholarships and Competitions Help Cut College Costs

Art school can be a big investment, depending on the type of degree you pursue. Between tuition, books, and supplies, an education in art can easily add up.

Fortunately, there’s ample opportunity for you to subsidize the cost of your education with scholarships and competition award money.

“It takes research, but there is actually a lot of scholarship money that isn’t used each year because the right student with the exactly right qualifications doesn’t apply,” says Kim Resnik, director of communications for The Art Institute of Atlanta and The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Atlanta.

Most of those opportunities are provided to students by the schools they attend. Students of The Art Institutes schools, for example, can earn up to a $20,000 tuition scholarship via The Art Institutes National Honor Society Scholarship.  The schools also offer fashion, poster design, photography, and culinary competitions.  More information about the scholarships available to Art Institutes students can be found at http://www.artinstitutes.edu/pdf/financial-aid/scholarship-booklet.pdf

But there are various nonprofits and arts organizations that offer scholarship programs and competitions, regardless of what school you attend. Websites like http://www.fastweb.com/, http://www.scholarships.com/ and http://www.financialaidfinder.com/scholarships/ list hundreds of scholarships. There is no cost to you to use the sites.

“Legitimate sites are free – students should never pay a fee to research scholarship opportunities or to apply for a scholarship,” says Resnick.

Scholarships and proceeds from competitions can make college more affordable, but they also give students who take the time to apply some invaluable experience, says Resnik.

“Students who complete and submit a contest entry are developing not only their talent and skills, but their ability to go above and beyond the minimum required by their high school classes,” Resnik says. “They are willing to put themselves and their work out there to be seen and judged.”